In Galerie Emanuel Layr’s current exhibition, Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, and Margaret Raspé revel the creative process as a kind of sickness, something akin to an incurable fever! The exhibition, curated by Kari Rittenbach, works to recontextualize womanhood, domesticity, and creative production.

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Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, Margaret Raspé, Curated by Kari Rittenbach, Installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna.

The exhibition features new sculptures from Henke’s Female Fatigue series. In My Piece of Cake and His Piece of Cake, sand, ceramic, and metal structures are tethered by classic pink rubber bands and accompanied by the corresponding molds. In these works, Henke pays homage to the innovation of Austrian architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky best known for her reinvention of the household kitchen, now commonly know as the Frankfurt Kitchen, whose streamlined design helped liberate the 1920s woman from the drudgery of housework.

Lisa Holzer’s photographs, enter the exhibition with a droopy, earth-toned, guttural smear. Puréed lentils and pure white sugar icing are reductive, sexy, and take center stage, like something between excrement and an abstract expressionist brush stroke executed with a spatula. These corporal photographs sweat beads of acrylic paint, their stillness challenging an appearance of exhalation.

Margaret Raspé’s super 8 films from the 1970s play throughout the gallery on a continuous loop. Raspé’s films were recorded point of view style by strapping the camera to a workman’s helmet, a technique that allowed Raspé to turn her everyday movements into performance. The impetus for this use of the camera spawned from a desire to expand on the political issues of the 1970s surrounding reproductive labor. The imagery in her films oscillates between scenes of domestic work and artistic production.

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