Last Saturday, inside the marbled walls of a historic Art Deco bank in downtown Miami, local film and art collective Borscht organized an evening of performances, video screenings, and installations, as part of their tenth film festival running February 22 to 26.

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Trina, da baddest bitch and a Miami icon, headlined the festivities with a raucous set performed on top of the bank’s vault.

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Poetry Curtains by Baltimore-based artist sadpapsmear (above) glowed beneath the room’s vaulted ceilings. The Albert I. Dupont building offered a dramatic backdrop for the works, many of which were by female-identifying artists commissioned for the event and funded by a grant from La Croix.

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Baltimore-based artists Marnie Ellen and sadpapsmear

Artists performing and presenting work included Adriana De La Torre, Antonia Wright, Jillian Mayer, Cristine Brache, Gabrielle Horruitiner, Marnie Ellen, King Coochie, Kelly Loudenberg, Rachel Johnson, Fereshteh Toosi, sadpapsmear, Betsy Holt, Hyperbody & Honda, POORgrrrl, Ambar Navarro, Natalia Lassalle-Morillo, Hope Harrelson, Marcelline Mandeng, Fereshteh Torsi, Ana Trevino, Desiree Moore, Alejandra Abad, Devyn Waitt, Marissa Goldman, Devin Harclerode, Keenon Brice, Erin Grant, Rindon Johnson, Adriana Cristal x Negashi Armada, Anna K.E., Miles Pflanz, Claire Côté, Lily Gottschalk, Lesley Nicole Braun, Dese Escobar, Sadaf H. Nava, Whitney Mallett, and FlucT x Minnie Bennett.

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FlucT x Minnie Bennett, Sissy Joker La Pieta

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Rachel Johnson, Escaped Exotics Field Guide

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Miami-based Artists Rachel Johnson and Gabrielle Horruitiner

On February 5, India Salvor Menuez brought together artists and performers including Maria José, Sara Grace Powell, Rowan Oliver, Ser Serpas, Women’s History Museum, Ariel Zetina, Jahmal Golden, and Gia Garrison. Presented as part of MoMA Ps1’s Sunday Sessions series, their original works interrogated queerness, trans-feminine social dissonance, the othering of women, out identity, the symbolic connotations of garments, and collective consciousness.

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Kate Steciw and Letha Wilson continue to reconsider photography as a medium via digital imagery with their coinciding solo exhibitions at Galerie Christophe Gaillard in Paris.
The works collectively respond to the incorporeality of digital life breaking from the repetitive linear photographic works which were very much in style during the early aughts.

In the front gallery, Steciw’s objects morph into satin spaghetti, coiled on the gallery floor. The works are digitally altered, alluding tools of photoshop. Stewics’s digital collages hint at the new role of imagery as a material of mass production plays. The industrialization of imagery and the software used to alter that imagery replaces classical sculptural material.

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Featured in the gallery’s main space are the works of Letha Wilson. Surface Moves, continues the discussion of photographic relevance. In the center of the gallery two large spherical steel pipes rest on the rippling pleats of a twenty-gauge steel print of a landscape. Wilson expounds on the narrative qualities of these tactile works, with titles such as Rabbit Ears Pass Cement Fold (Double Angle I), 2016 and California Concrete Ripple Tondo, 2016. The man-made industrial materials used in Wilson’s work next to an image of a serene landscape create a natural disruptions for the viewer. These distortions are at once natural and combative as they reveal Wilson’s reconsideration not just of the presentation of photography but of the convergence of the natural and the technological as well.

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Recently national fast food chain, Freshness Burger introduced an innovative solution to eating limitations prescribed by the cultural trend of “Ochobo” meaning small and modest mouth.
With the “Liberation Wrapper,” Japanese women can freely scarf down the company’s largest and messiest burger on the menu, the “Classic Burger” while maintaining a neat and poised composure.

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Freshness Burger cleverly employed methods of illusion in their burger wrapper design, by placing the face of a closed mouth woman on the diamond shaped holder just big enough to cover the offending burger eater’s guzzling chomp. Freshness Burger included a commercial video in their promotion of the “Liberation Wrapper” citing that it was to “free women from the spell of ‘Ochobo’”. According to the company, sales of the “Classic Burger” have increased 213% since the introduction of this new campaign, however, it should be noted that while this may have been a lucrative move for Freshness Burger, it has done little in the way of true liberation.

In Galerie Emanuel Layr’s current exhibition, Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, and Margaret Raspé revel the creative process as a kind of sickness, something akin to an incurable fever! The exhibition, curated by Kari Rittenbach, works to recontextualize womanhood, domesticity, and creative production.

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Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, Margaret Raspé, Curated by Kari Rittenbach, Installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna.

The exhibition features new sculptures from Henke’s Female Fatigue series. In My Piece of Cake and His Piece of Cake, sand, ceramic, and metal structures are tethered by classic pink rubber bands and accompanied by the corresponding molds. In these works, Henke pays homage to the innovation of Austrian architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky best known for her reinvention of the household kitchen, now commonly know as the Frankfurt Kitchen, whose streamlined design helped liberate the 1920s woman from the drudgery of housework.

Lisa Holzer’s photographs, enter the exhibition with a droopy, earth-toned, guttural smear. Puréed lentils and pure white sugar icing are reductive, sexy, and take center stage, like something between excrement and an abstract expressionist brush stroke executed with a spatula. These corporal photographs sweat beads of acrylic paint, their stillness challenging an appearance of exhalation.

Margaret Raspé’s super 8 films from the 1970s play throughout the gallery on a continuous loop. Raspé’s films were recorded point of view style by strapping the camera to a workman’s helmet, a technique that allowed Raspé to turn her everyday movements into performance. The impetus for this use of the camera spawned from a desire to expand on the political issues of the 1970s surrounding reproductive labor. The imagery in her films oscillates between scenes of domestic work and artistic production.

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I know what you’re doing tonight. Not staying at home and watching “Stranger Things.” Dese and David Moses have back to school GLAM ready for you at China Chalet. Grab your Warby Parkers (with no prescription) and head downtown to see your friends, the stars of New York nightlife.

Music BY
LAFAWNDAH
DJ BEBE
EZRA MARCUS
DJ DJ DESE
DAVID MOSES

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HOSTED BY
JAKE LEVY
VAQUERA
ZAINA MIUCCIA
KYLE LUU
GRACE AHLBOM
JACOLBY SATTERWHITE
ZSELA KUTI
MORGAN REHBOCK
JOSEPH GEAGAN

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Susan Cianciolo will be leading a fanzine workshop at the Swiss Insitute this Tuesday. Workshop participants will be educated about Cianciolo’s self-published books and zines, not to mention create zines themselves using materials provided by S.I.

Susan Cianciolo is a fashion designer, installation artist, and filmmaker. During the last twenty years, the scope of her work has included fashion, art, craft, and performance. Her RUN collections produced from 1995 to 2001 were commercially successful and critically acclaimed. Cianciolo’s works are featured in museums and galleries across the world. Most recently she has exhibited with Yale Union, Bridget Donahue, and MoMA PS1.

Fanzine Workshop with Susan Cianciolo
Tuesday, August 23rd
7pm-8:30pm
Swiss Institute
102 Franklin Street
New York, New York 10013

RSVP with subject line “Susan Cianciolo Fanzine Workshop” to rsvp@swissinstitute.net

“What time is it?” probed Rasheedah Phillips, one half of the Philadelphia-based collective Black Quantum Futurism, who together with collaborator Camae Defstar, delivered a charged performance interrogating the political nature of temporal consciousness at Artists Space on July 14. Comparing the Western linear time construct with the general indigenous African time consciousness, Black Quantum Futurism’s performance traced the roots of white Southern slave masters using time as a form of social control, unraveling the ways time continues to confine us, especially those on the edges, margins, and intersections of society, in an effort to imagine new possibilities. “Out of the dust of the crumbling institutions of science,” Phillips proclaimed, “comes […] Black Quantum Futurism, a new science for a new world of our own making.”


Video shot by Ursula Mann and edited by Jason Hirata.

Black Quantum Futurism performed during an evening curated by Topical Cream, along with Bronx-based rapper Quay Dash, Middle Eastern songstress LAFAWNDAH in collaboration with writer Amy Zimmer, experimental noise duo MSHR, and a soundscape by post-trance producer DOSS. See full documentation of all the performances hosted by Artists Space and check out photos below by Walter Wlodarczyk.

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walter-wlodarczyk-2016-07-14-0246Quay Dash
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walter-wlodarczyk-2016-07-14-0398LAFAWNDAH with Amy Zimmer

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More photos of the performances by Luis Nieto Dickens at nosleep.co

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Topical Cream presents a critical dosage of live performances by Black Quantum Futurism, Quay Dash, MSHR and LAFAWNDAH, set to a soundscape by DOSS.

Hostesses
Arshy Azizi
Avena Gallagher
Dese
Seashell Coker
Lisa Cooley
M/L Artspace
Rózsa Farkas
Safety Corp
Tauba Auerbach
Whitney Mallett

Topical Cream Presents
Artists Space
55 Walker St.
$5 Suggested Donation
Thursday, July 14,2016
7-9pm,

RSVP
100% of proceeds will go to The Center, Orlando’s principal LGBTQ organization assisting victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting and their families with financial and emotional support.

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Conveying the atmosphere of postmodern despair, the work of Beata Wilczek weaves together bleached out visions of runways, sweatshops, couture gowns, and lusciously blooming flowers. Her latest video “Everything Goes Even More Stays” involves a first-person commentary on the the ludicrous pace of commodified fashion and interrogates the responsibility of the average consumer, all the while dwelling on images of shopping online.

Screening: Everything Goes Even More Stays
Health Mate Cafe, London
Saturday, June 18th
6pm to 9pm