Showing posts by Yelena Keller. Go back to the main blog page.

Kate Steciw and Letha Wilson continue to reconsider photography as a medium via digital imagery with their coinciding solo exhibitions at Galerie Christophe Gaillard in Paris.
The works collectively respond to the incorporeality of digital life breaking from the repetitive linear photographic works which were very much in style during the early aughts.

In the front gallery, Steciw’s objects morph into satin spaghetti, coiled on the gallery floor. The works are digitally altered, alluding tools of photoshop. Stewics’s digital collages hint at the new role of imagery as a material of mass production plays. The industrialization of imagery and the software used to alter that imagery replaces classical sculptural material.

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Featured in the gallery’s main space are the works of Letha Wilson. Surface Moves, continues the discussion of photographic relevance. In the center of the gallery two large spherical steel pipes rest on the rippling pleats of a twenty-gauge steel print of a landscape. Wilson expounds on the narrative qualities of these tactile works, with titles such as Rabbit Ears Pass Cement Fold (Double Angle I), 2016 and California Concrete Ripple Tondo, 2016. The man-made industrial materials used in Wilson’s work next to an image of a serene landscape create a natural disruptions for the viewer. These distortions are at once natural and combative as they reveal Wilson’s reconsideration not just of the presentation of photography but of the convergence of the natural and the technological as well.

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Recently national fast food chain, Freshness Burger introduced an innovative solution to eating limitations prescribed by the cultural trend of “Ochobo” meaning small and modest mouth.
With the “Liberation Wrapper,” Japanese women can freely scarf down the company’s largest and messiest burger on the menu, the “Classic Burger” while maintaining a neat and poised composure.

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Freshness Burger cleverly employed methods of illusion in their burger wrapper design, by placing the face of a closed mouth woman on the diamond shaped holder just big enough to cover the offending burger eater’s guzzling chomp. Freshness Burger included a commercial video in their promotion of the “Liberation Wrapper” citing that it was to “free women from the spell of ‘Ochobo’”. According to the company, sales of the “Classic Burger” have increased 213% since the introduction of this new campaign, however, it should be noted that while this may have been a lucrative move for Freshness Burger, it has done little in the way of true liberation.

In Galerie Emanuel Layr’s current exhibition, Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, and Margaret Raspé revel the creative process as a kind of sickness, something akin to an incurable fever! The exhibition, curated by Kari Rittenbach, works to recontextualize womanhood, domesticity, and creative production.

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Fieber, Lena Henke, Lisa Holzer, Margaret Raspé, Curated by Kari Rittenbach, Installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna.

The exhibition features new sculptures from Henke’s Female Fatigue series. In My Piece of Cake and His Piece of Cake, sand, ceramic, and metal structures are tethered by classic pink rubber bands and accompanied by the corresponding molds. In these works, Henke pays homage to the innovation of Austrian architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky best known for her reinvention of the household kitchen, now commonly know as the Frankfurt Kitchen, whose streamlined design helped liberate the 1920s woman from the drudgery of housework.

Lisa Holzer’s photographs, enter the exhibition with a droopy, earth-toned, guttural smear. Puréed lentils and pure white sugar icing are reductive, sexy, and take center stage, like something between excrement and an abstract expressionist brush stroke executed with a spatula. These corporal photographs sweat beads of acrylic paint, their stillness challenging an appearance of exhalation.

Margaret Raspé’s super 8 films from the 1970s play throughout the gallery on a continuous loop. Raspé’s films were recorded point of view style by strapping the camera to a workman’s helmet, a technique that allowed Raspé to turn her everyday movements into performance. The impetus for this use of the camera spawned from a desire to expand on the political issues of the 1970s surrounding reproductive labor. The imagery in her films oscillates between scenes of domestic work and artistic production.

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