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© Leandro Justen

Anna Holmes and Eileen Myles

Thursday June 14, Creative Time and the New York Public Library brought together poet and writer Eileen Myles, writer and Jezebel.com founder Anna Holmes, and artist and musician JD Samson for an evening themed around the idea of constructing a 21st-century feminism.

© Leandro Justen

JD Samson center, in a shirt made of rocks

Following a conversation between Myles and Holmes that spanned the commodification of identity, literal boys clubs, and menopause, Samson performed with January Hunt and Laura Dune as well as members of the Lower Eastside Girls Club and Xhoir.

© Leandro Justen

January Hunt

Here are some excerpts from Myles and Holmes’s dialogue:

EM: Is keeping a diary feminist? Growing up, part of what you were grappling with was not being silent. As a young female, I was constantly being invited to be silent.

AH: None of my peers would identify as “feminist.” This was ’92 or ’93. It was made toxic. Now there’s women with the T-shirts and it’s a whole marketing thing.

EM: It starts to be your career. You are always being reminded that you are female. You are always being asked to weigh in about being female. It constantly displaces you from the narrative you are trying to make.

AH: It’s the same for writers for color. I wanted to start a digital property that would only be populated by writers of color but they wouldn’t write about race at all.

© Leandro Justen

The audience at the second event in the In Situ series, a collaboration between Creative Time and the New York Public Library.

EM: When I’m alone, am I a feminist? When I’m alone, am I a female?

AH: What did you want to be when you grew up?

EM: An astronaut. What about you?

AH: A dancer. I was very extroverted as a child but then at about 10 or 11, something happened that I think happens to a lot of people. I fell into myself.

EM: You are going through this transition and it’s unmarked, undiscussed, unritualized. You are being told to hide, just like menopause. My mid-40s started to get weird and operatic. I was so productive, I must have written three books. I was nuts. It’s psychedelic. A lot of women I knew started drinking and drugging again. Five women I knew killed themselves that decade.

AH: [on the political moment] Right now, norms are being broken, lines are being crossed, but there’s not an outcry. It’s not a lack of interest. It’s a feeling of impotence.



Photos by Leandro Justen

Marie_Karlberg_Artist

“This past March, Reena Spauling presented Marie Karlberg’s “1 Hour of Limited Movement” at Market Art Fair in Stockholm, Sweden. For this performance, Karlberg stands isolated in a perspex box. The artist is clad in a black turtleneck and tights (a proper mix of casual dress and performance wear) and irreverently blows smoke toward an audience of art professionals as disembodied voices read texts over a loud speaker. Critiquing power structures within the art market, the texts (from unnamed gallerists) invite the artist to participate in various upcoming exhibitions but, always with budgetary or some other restriction. In several of the emails, gallerists remind the artist “what an opportunity” they are offering, even though there is no budget left to cover basic costs. Karlberg, states “I use performance to critic expectations of young artists’ marketability and the careers that consolidate out of that, in a personal way.”

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Marie Karlberg, “1 Hour of Limited Movement,” 2017, perspex, cigarette, champagne and glasses, eye shadow, body of the artist.

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Last Saturday, inside the marbled walls of a historic Art Deco bank in downtown Miami, local film and art collective Borscht organized an evening of performances, video screenings, and installations, as part of their tenth film festival running February 22 to 26.

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Trina, da baddest bitch and a Miami icon, headlined the festivities with a raucous set performed on top of the bank’s vault.

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Poetry Curtains by Baltimore-based artist sadpapsmear (above) glowed beneath the room’s vaulted ceilings. The Albert I. Dupont building offered a dramatic backdrop for the works, many of which were by female-identifying artists commissioned for the event and funded by a grant from La Croix.

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Baltimore-based artists Marnie Ellen and sadpapsmear

Artists performing and presenting work included Adriana De La Torre, Antonia Wright, Jillian Mayer, Cristine Brache, Gabrielle Horruitiner, Marnie Ellen, King Coochie, Kelly Loudenberg, Rachel Johnson, Fereshteh Toosi, sadpapsmear, Betsy Holt, Hyperbody & Honda, POORgrrrl, Ambar Navarro, Natalia Lassalle-Morillo, Hope Harrelson, Marcelline Mandeng, Fereshteh Torsi, Ana Trevino, Desiree Moore, Alejandra Abad, Devyn Waitt, Marissa Goldman, Devin Harclerode, Keenon Brice, Erin Grant, Rindon Johnson, Adriana Cristal x Negashi Armada, Anna K.E., Miles Pflanz, Claire Côté, Lily Gottschalk, Lesley Nicole Braun, Dese Escobar, Sadaf H. Nava, Whitney Mallett, and FlucT x Minnie Bennett.

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FlucT x Minnie Bennett, Sissy Joker La Pieta

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Rachel Johnson, Escaped Exotics Field Guide

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Miami-based Artists Rachel Johnson and Gabrielle Horruitiner

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Susan Cianciolo will be leading a fanzine workshop at the Swiss Insitute this Tuesday. Workshop participants will be educated about Cianciolo’s self-published books and zines, not to mention create zines themselves using materials provided by S.I.

Susan Cianciolo is a fashion designer, installation artist, and filmmaker. During the last twenty years, the scope of her work has included fashion, art, craft, and performance. Her RUN collections produced from 1995 to 2001 were commercially successful and critically acclaimed. Cianciolo’s works are featured in museums and galleries across the world. Most recently she has exhibited with Yale Union, Bridget Donahue, and MoMA PS1.

Fanzine Workshop with Susan Cianciolo
Tuesday, August 23rd
7pm-8:30pm
Swiss Institute
102 Franklin Street
New York, New York 10013

RSVP with subject line “Susan Cianciolo Fanzine Workshop” to rsvp@swissinstitute.net

“What time is it?” probed Rasheedah Phillips, one half of the Philadelphia-based collective Black Quantum Futurism, who together with collaborator Camae Defstar, delivered a charged performance interrogating the political nature of temporal consciousness at Artists Space on July 14. Comparing the Western linear time construct with the general indigenous African time consciousness, Black Quantum Futurism’s performance traced the roots of white Southern slave masters using time as a form of social control, unraveling the ways time continues to confine us, especially those on the edges, margins, and intersections of society, in an effort to imagine new possibilities. “Out of the dust of the crumbling institutions of science,” Phillips proclaimed, “comes […] Black Quantum Futurism, a new science for a new world of our own making.”


Video shot by Ursula Mann and edited by Jason Hirata.

Black Quantum Futurism performed during an evening curated by Topical Cream, along with Bronx-based rapper Quay Dash, Middle Eastern songstress LAFAWNDAH in collaboration with writer Amy Zimmer, experimental noise duo MSHR, and a soundscape by post-trance producer DOSS. See full documentation of all the performances hosted by Artists Space and check out photos below by Walter Wlodarczyk.

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walter-wlodarczyk-2016-07-14-0246Quay Dash
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walter-wlodarczyk-2016-07-14-0398LAFAWNDAH with Amy Zimmer

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walter-wlodarczyk-2016-07-14-0688MSHR (Brenna Murhpy and Birch Cooper)

More photos of the performances by Luis Nieto Dickens at nosleep.co

CLEANSE_MIND

Topical Cream presents a critical dosage of live performances by Black Quantum Futurism, Quay Dash, MSHR and LAFAWNDAH, set to a soundscape by DOSS.

Hostesses
Arshy Azizi
Avena Gallagher
Dese
Seashell Coker
Lisa Cooley
M/L Artspace
Rózsa Farkas
Safety Corp
Tauba Auerbach
Whitney Mallett

Topical Cream Presents
Artists Space
55 Walker St.
$5 Suggested Donation
Thursday, July 14,2016
7-9pm,

RSVP
100% of proceeds will go to The Center, Orlando’s principal LGBTQ organization assisting victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting and their families with financial and emotional support.

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Conveying the atmosphere of postmodern despair, the work of Beata Wilczek weaves together bleached out visions of runways, sweatshops, couture gowns, and lusciously blooming flowers. Her latest video “Everything Goes Even More Stays” involves a first-person commentary on the the ludicrous pace of commodified fashion and interrogates the responsibility of the average consumer, all the while dwelling on images of shopping online.

Screening: Everything Goes Even More Stays
Health Mate Cafe, London
Saturday, June 18th
6pm to 9pm

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“In Bed Together” at the Berlin Biennale is M/L Artspace’s 10th and only offering in a traditional gallery space to date. The installation, which is an artwork produced by the duo of Lena Henke and Marie Karlberg as opposed to a curated exhibition in a non-traditional space, is a chill out zone, slash Bedouin tent constructed from screen-printed pastel cotton sheets. The sheets double as bed coverings, as well as provide an architectural structure to the space. A flat screen TV sits at the foot of the bed, playing a home video of friends and family “In Bed Together” indulging in pre-social media awareness Bacchanalian revelry.

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Gender Talents is gearing up for it’s inaugural issue. This issue includes perspectives from Juliana Huxtable, Kim Drew and Andreas Angelidakis. Riley Hooker explains why the project is so urgent. “Gender Talents makes a complex and urgent subject accessible without dumbing it down. Supporting this campaign funds the mass production of Gender Talents and helps to proliferate a deeper understanding of gender in the 21st century. Knowledge is the only weapon we have against the adversity and violence that people outside of the gender majorities face on a daily basis. This reality only worsens when it’s compounded by sexuality and race. Slogans and buzzwords are an important part of activism, but can only serve as the gateway to rich political ideas that warrant further consideration from curious minds. Gender Talents exposes the process of three dynamic thinkers as they make their way through a constellation of self-determined gender. They offer vivid metaphors that have proven to be an effective learning tool, and make for a pleasurable and stimulating read for anyone interested in the subject.”

ScienceFiction
The emergence of science fiction as a legitimate theme in contemporary art has made a slow and curious emergence in the art world as of recent, and has done so without much critical debate. Historically, science fiction-themed art works would have automatically fallen under category of outsider art, fan fiction, or fantasy paintings. However, this is not the case anymore. In 2016, science fiction movies, books, and concepts are quoted in press releases without a hint of irony or suggestion of the subject’s more complicated past.

Please join us tonight.

Science Fiction in Contemporary Art: A Panel Discussion
Lisa Cooley
106 Norfolk Street
New York, New York 10002
Wednesday, May 11th
7pm to 8pm

Drinks @ Double Down Saloon